How socialization and racial bias combine to create disproportionately negative educational outcomes for students of color.

All levels of education are dominated by White teachers in the classroom. In Chicago, “52% of CPS teachers are white, 21% are African American and 20% Latino, while the student population is 90% black, Latino and other children of color.” Interestingly, the student population is striking different, with, “…less than 10 percent of enrolled CPS students are white, while 39 percent are black and 46 percent are Hispanic.” As a White male who was raised in a Midwestern suburb, every single teacher I had from K-12 was White. Nearly every one of my friends were White. Today, as an educator…


Carol Dweck changed how I view education and my feedback as an educator

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Earlier this week I decided to explore the experiences of young students. Driven by the reality that our son is about to enter the Chicago Public School system, I felt it necessary to do a dive into the world of K-12 education; a world I am definitely not experienced. Many of the students in these articles were in middle-school, others in elementary. The entire time I was reading these articles I found myself wondering how these theories and ideas can be translated into college students. As a sociology instructor for the better part of the last decade, it has been…


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When the pandemic came, none of us were ready, especially in higher education. Even the most seasoned remote educators were shaken by the abrupt transition of an entire system of education to a format that most educators had relegated to the dark corners of academic to be ignored, taunted, and otherwise obfuscated from the view of students for fear that the institution would be devalued into the category of for-profit charlatan educators (Cicha, Rizun, Rutecka, & Strzelecki (2021). True, a number of for-profit institutions tried and failed (some miserably) to extract large sums of money from students seeking social mobility…


COVID-19 upended student progress across the board…but don’t let lawmakers decide the fate of our children.

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My son is 4-years old. Luckily for us, his “school” (rather a parent-driven co-op for early learning) was able to reopen during the pandemic allowing him the opportunity to resume in-class interactions. Without their assistance over the last year, it would have been impossible for us to survive and for him to progress given that my wife and I both work full-time from the comforts of our couches which loosely translates into a budding relationship between young Jimmy and our iPad. This, of course, is not sustainable. Children need to interact with others, and they thrive in the company of…


For anyone sitting in D.C. on account of our votes, listen up! We’re dying out here!

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Global pandemics are bad for business and bad for families. Business wise, millions of people lost their jobs over the last year, doors shuttered permanently, and CEOs took bonuses as they wait out the pandemic from their gilded gated community where vaccines flow like water. For families, millions went homeless, un(der) fed and under supported in myriad ways, and/or lost a loved one (or more) due to lack of access to premium healthcare. For the 44 million student loan borrowers out there accounting for the $1.7 trillion in student loan debt — with an average amount of almost $30k ($29,900)…


How the roots of white supremacy taints the reality of who can and who cannot be an artist.

Much of what is understood to be art and artistic in education in the United States is rooted in a white supremacist notion of what normal is. Normalcy and whiteness are often characterized as universal notions. If deviated from in any capacity, negative reactions become a very real consequence. When it comes to determining what art is, we can look to the aristocracy for evidence of what they value and why. Leavy talks about some physical reactions to art, music, literature, and…


Get used to it, folks. Remote learning is here to stay…and Remote Learning Environments (RLE) can actually be awesome!

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Millions of Americans were forced to transition to a world of education they, perhaps, had only heard about. A world where human interaction exists in virtual spaces. A world where assignments come in the form of online activities, quizzes and exams, video postings, discussion boards, and more are the new normal for academia. In this world those who hold are open to a complete reimagination of higher education will survive and their institutions stood. Those who cling to an outdated model…


One student’s perspective from the frontlines of racist curriculum

Author’s Note

When I first started this project, how do linguistic and cultural diversity connect to teaching and learning, I immediately thought about a former student of mine. As an undocumented immigrant living in the United States since the age of 7, they have a great deal of experience attempting to navigate the American education system. I recently called them to talk about their experiences with ESL classes and this brief, informal interview, is the focus of this paper. …


Leverage your talents gained during remote learning to maximize your earnings…or at least get a job.

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Let me be candid here for a minute…remote learning sucks. Why does it suck? For a million and two reasons, but primarily because it deprives an individual from the physical interaction with the material, their instructor, their peers, and a dedicated learning environment. As millions of us have altered the contours of our homes to accommodate a new space where we can dedicate to our studies, bedrooms and living rooms are taking on a whole new meaning. But for what? So that we can get a piece of paper that essentially denotes our ability to suffer through long Zoom meetings…


Why spend good money to have a bad time?

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These last 365 days since the beginning of colleges and universities shuttering to prevent widespread outbreaks of COVID-19 have been a mess, euphemistically. Student mental health decreased, food and housing insecurity increased, professors with no business leading an online class were forced to adapt their curriculum to the virtual format…some on their own. Suffice it to say, administrators, faculty, staff who survived (literally!) the last academic year are looking forward to summer break and putting this all behind them…only to revisit the same storm we’ve unsuccessfully attempted to chart an effective course through.

That said, there are glimmers of hope…

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